Tag Archives: The Creators Project

Saturday 07/8 2017
Inside A Hermosa House, A History Of Latin American Art

“A massive Hector Duarte painting greets you right as you walk in the front door, depicting an avian heart encircled by gnashing border guard dogs. It symbolizes the pieces of their spirit immigrants must leave behind. Directly next to it is an early Marcos Raya, a portrait of the artist in a bar, the countertop now a butcher’s block, a gun and bottle before him and the leering demons of his alcoholism floating just above. Together they depict the complicated reality of immigrant life, a life Salgado knows personally.”

Read the rest of my story about the Coleccion Salgado in Creators

Monday 02/27 2017
A Fairer Form of Gentrification

“Indianapolis’ Tube Factory Artspace is best understood not as a structure, but as a multifaceted art practice on a municipal scale. Heralded in The Guardian as a “fairer form of gentrification,” art collective Big Car‘s maker space and community center is the central hub for their efforts to invigorate the Garfield Park neighborhood, buoyed by ten houses owned by the collective, a second renovated factory, and a sound-art gallery and radio station.

“One thing that sets us apart is that we operate as a community center and a museum,” Big Car co-founder and Tube Factory commissioning curator Shauta Marsh tells Creators. Tube Factory is used for neighborhood association meetings, clubs, classes, and other events, as well as showing art and providing work spaces and a tool library.”

Read the rest at Creators

Monday 02/6 2017
Meet the Artists Who Came of Age Post-AIDS Epidemic

Conversations with artist and ACT UP videographer Rudy Lemcke—who has work in Art AIDS America—while living in the Bay Area first got [show curator Danny] Orendorff thinking about the intergenerational divide with the epidemic. For some, it was a war lived on the front lines, with the casualties to match; for others, a terrible but foggy memory of a tragic past. And for populations underserved by institutional efforts to treat HIV/AIDS, the epidemic has never really left, hanging on their eaves and haunting their communities.

Read the rest at The Creators Project

Monday 01/2 2017
Developing the Future in Tear Gas Remedies

“The installation A 240 Second Analysis of Failure and Hopefulness (with Coke, Vinegar, and other Tear Gas Remedies) consists of 160 color slides shown on two synchronized slide carousel projectors. It is a slideshow of the urban life cycle: building gets knocked down, new building gets put up, until it becomes old and/or unwanted enough or its land becomes desirable enough to have it get knocked down again. [Basim] Magdy’s films were bathed in Coke, vinegar, and tear gas remedies, in a process the artist calls “pickling,” resulting in otherworldly blues, pinks, and greens with the hazy buzz of old 3D images or ancient photos.”

Read the rest in The Creators Project

Wednesday 10/26 2016
The Towel Covered in What You Cover

“Few objects are as noble as the bath towel. It provides dryness and warmth when one needs it most and modesty when instant covering-up is comme il faut; it can carry a surprising amount of social weight, the secret flag of body politics. Then there’s Ken Kagami’s bath towel, printed in collaboration with the artist’s issue of the quarterly art publication/zine THE THING, published by artists Jonn Herschend and Will Rogan, wherein one also receives a piece of art with every issue.

The white towel is covered in cartoonish blue scribbles of penises and vaginas, breasts and butts. More cute than comely, Kagami’s body parts are done in his signature style, simple and laced with humor, bright eyes, and happy smiles adding an anatomically incorrect touch of absurdity.”

Read the rest at The Creators Project

Tuesday 09/27 2016
Blades, Waves, and Rhombi

Interference builds upon the rhombus-heavy infrastructures of digital art and information, as well as wave forms inspired by synthesizers and medical imaging devices. Finley tapes out each shape, then begins the painstaking process of painting them.The works appear backlit by bright neons, and shimmer with an ethereal iridescence reminiscent of polarized sunglasses, motorcycle windscreens, and pearls. The paintings hover between the naturalistic—the rippling, bait ball effect of Lost in the Waves—and the futuristic (a piece called Debug is built with the angular skeletons of digital animation; a histological study of corrupted computer code).”

Read the rest of my write up of Shannon Finley’s solo show in The Creators Project

Sunday 08/28 2016
Ukrainian Art 25 Years After Independence

“Anna Bogatin had lived in numerous parts of the Soviet Union before moving to America in 1992, a cultural shift reflected in her practice’s blending of the high and low tech. Picture of nature are subjected to digital studies, before being painted painstakingly by hand. The end result is a prismatic abstraction, an infographic of the natural.”

Read the rest at The Creators Project

Monday 08/15 2016
Wrenching, Riding, and Drinking Beer: Women and Wheels

“Take, for example, the soft shades of green shot through “Stephanie – 1966 Suzuki Bearcat B105p 118cc,” or how the hot mist of the pyroclastic flow of the burnout in “Melissa – 1975 Honda CB400″ echoes in the pattern of her plaid shirt, the distress of her denim jeans, and the gleaming rubber of her boots, tires, and seat. She wants the women comfortable and showing off their vehicles; Vaun will postpone shoots if a favorite bike needs work, rather than have them shoot with a friend’s. The agency is completely returned to the rider.”

Read the rest of my write up about Sarah Vaun’s photo series in The Creators Project

Friday 07/29 2016
Carlos Rolón Tells Us, Sincerely

“Shattered tempered glass twinkles coquettishly, promising danger and beauty. Growing up in Brighton Park on Chicago’s Southwest Side, Rolón remembers both the exquisiteness of the sun striking broken car windows in the street and the realization that something bad had happened to make that shimmering moment. These pieces in the Bochinche room take elements from the shattered window and evoke a night sky.”

Read the rest at The Creators Project

Friday 07/1 2016
Commercials for Communism

“Seeking to illuminate the West’s blind spot for Southeast Asia, the Ho Chi Minh City art collective-cum-advertising company The Propeller Group produces ambitious multimedia projects through artifacts, videos, and sculptural works … The Propeller Group delves into deep issues with surprising approachability, something that can be credited to their experiences in the commercial realm. Free of haughty abstraction, they seek to make art that is both powerful and easy to grasp.”

Read the rest of my preview of The Propeller Group’s solo MCA show at The Creators Project