Tag Archives: film

Monday 03/13 2017
Cinema Fatalite: Ben Murray at Moique Meloche

“In Life Review, Ben Murray’s solo show at Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago, continues the artist’s reconnaissance of the maddeningly amorphous landscape of memory, here pinned to the walls in its most dramatic form. The “life review” is the classic, quasi-paranormal event wherein one’s life flashes before one’s eyes—in totality, crystal-clear—during a near death experience. A fictional trope and indelible fact to those who have experienced them, the life review is memory armed with the exigency of death, its celerity contrary to every little thing we imagine about ourselves—that we are some grand elegy in our total, that we are incapable of reduction to a series of scenes—when in fact we are, of course, nothing but scenes, none ever seen from the same perspective twice, singular in both our mind and the minds of others.”

Read the rest of my review in New American Paintings

Monday 01/2 2017
Developing the Future in Tear Gas Remedies

“The installation A 240 Second Analysis of Failure and Hopefulness (with Coke, Vinegar, and other Tear Gas Remedies) consists of 160 color slides shown on two synchronized slide carousel projectors. It is a slideshow of the urban life cycle: building gets knocked down, new building gets put up, until it becomes old and/or unwanted enough or its land becomes desirable enough to have it get knocked down again. [Basim] Magdy’s films were bathed in Coke, vinegar, and tear gas remedies, in a process the artist calls “pickling,” resulting in otherworldly blues, pinks, and greens with the hazy buzz of old 3D images or ancient photos.”

Read the rest in The Creators Project

Wednesday 04/27 2016
Pieces of Us

“Shards” is strongest when seen as a rumination on the Great Beast of the medical-industrial complex, rather than the action of care. Gentle color play is juxtaposed with the downright primeval patterns the collages take, an atavistic wardrobe which alludes to the rapidly dying nature of the medium. As new forms of medical imaging—and, more importantly, as new, digital ways to collect, collate and quickly share the data contained in said images—arise, tapes such as these will eventually cede to fully digitized portraits of us. The shining staples are not surgical, they are the staples which bind, coagulate and eventually clot our bureaucratic medical system; the delicate monsters they hold together are the skeletons in the filing and medicine cabinets.”

Read the rest of my review of Deanna Kreuger’s Shards at Newcity

Monday 03/7 2016
Beyond the Crimson Veil (With Apologies to Doctor Strange)

“Holmquist’s tale is one of super-heroics, for the most part, the delightfully abstracted figures of his  paintings—long, electric, possessing in the them the quality of dancers, shimmering like Wonder Woman’s gauntlets or Superman’s curl with sprayed enamel and Holmquist’s proprietary quick-drying paint mixture, which allowed for the celerity of their creation, which in turn allows for these heavy and gorgeous paintings-as-sculptures to seem, despite the obvious weight of their application and density, impossibly fast, alive—moving throughout the exhibition and gallery and even dimensions, their powers seeming most like Doctor Strange’s, the man who walks through worlds … there they are in a painting! Again in a sculpture! Again in costume! Again in film!”

Read the rest of my review of Andrew Holmquist’s Carrie Secrist Gallery exhibition Stage Left at New American Paintings